Review of Tyga’s ‘Careless World – Rise of the Last King’

Careless World CoverWhen it comes to hip-hop, being named a “king” holds a lot of weight. Today, there are about three kings of the game right now; Lil Wayne, Kanye West, and Jay-Z. With their huge fanbase, lyrical prowess, and the almighty album sales, these three have what it takes to call themselves hip-hop royalty. This is just one of the reasons why I can’t take Tyga, a member of Lil Wayne’s Young Money, seriously as the “Last King” (as his album title implies). A couple other reasons has to do with where he started (remember Coconut Juice, anyone?) and this incredibly hilarious video of his hit single “Rack City.”

Regardless of how I feel about his position in the hip-hop hierarchy, I was ready to be proven wrong with his Young Money debut, Careless World: Rise of the Last King. However, I found myself asking when his self proclaimed reign would end, rather than celebrating.

Ok, that might sound awful. Let me just clarify; Careless World is 23 SONGS LONG, and almost two hours in length. There comes a point where you can really get into a rap album and seriously vibe to some of the songs, and a breaking point to where you want to be finished with the album.

Careless World is a mixed bag of hot club bangers, and solemn downers, both of which contradict each other quite a bit lyrically. All of the bangers talk about how he’s getting all these women, while all of the quieter songs happen to be just trying to stay with one girl. A little annoying, but something that is easily looked over. The Nicki Minaj-assisted “Muthaf**ka Up” is one of the hardest tracks here, backed by one catchy beat. . The single “Rack City” is a simplistic party song, for all those who are bragging about getting way too many women (including grandmas). “Potty Mouth” has some of the better verses from Tyga, with an awesome beat you can just vibe to. The biggest surprise? The seven minutes long “Love Game.” The track starts off just like any other R&B influenced rap song, then switches at the last two minutes and turned it into some shaky dubstep. Nothing I was expecting from a rap album, that’s for sure.

And let’s get to the featured artists; Pharrell, Nicki Minaj, Big Sean, Chris Brown and Wynter Gordon, Busta Rhymes, Lil Wayne, T-Pain, Chris Richardson, Robin Thicke, Wale & Nas, J Cole, Marsha Ambrosius, and Drake. Out of all of these guest artists, only a couple of them actually do a good job on the album. Busta Rhymes’ last minute in “Potty Mouth” tore up all of Tyga’s verses, almost harking back to Chris Brown’s “Look At Me Now.” Also, Chris Brown and Wynter Gordon’s chorus in “For The Fame” makes that song a lot more likable. Lastly, Nas and Wale’s verses in “Kings & Queens” trumped everything that the Young Money crew rapped in the entire album.

The biggest problem with this album is it’s length. Listening to the album from start to finish feels like a chore, which is a feeling you shouldn’t have while listening to something like this. Did you know that “Rack City” has an extra minute tied to the back end to that song, and instead of putting another verse there, it just loops the hook? If he cut out ten of these songs on Careless World, then I might look at this album in a different light. But just like every other album, the more you have, the more fault you let out. And there was just too many faults to compensate for the good.

Tyga is no king – yet. There is a lot of promise with him, and whenever the day comes and Lil Wayne stops rapping, I can definitely see him pick up and dust off his crown. Until that day, he can stand in that huge group of princes, and hope that the public will hand you your own crown someday.

Final Grade: C+

Go Download: “Kings & Queens (feat. Wale & Nas)

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